My name is Cynthia Paula Dan and I have been a certified translator since 2007. My educational background includes a BA in English and Norwegian from Babeș-Bolyai University, Cluj, Romania, and two MA: the first one in American Studies from Babeș-Bolyai University and the second in Ibsen Studies from the University of Oslo, Norway.

I worked as a teacher of Norwegian and English in Romania and Norway, a library assistant and as a self-employed translator.

I am a certified translator in English, Norwegian and Romanian my authorisation was issued by the Ministry of Justice, Bucharest. My translation from Norwegian into Romanian, Henrik Ibsen’s John Gabriel Borkman was published in 2010 at Dacia printing house from Cluj, Romania. This translation was analysed favourably by Mrs. Ruxandra Dumitrescu on the 12th of September 2012https://ruxandradumitrescu.wordpress.com/2012/09/12/john-gabriel-borkman-de-henrik-ibsen-recenzie/.

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THE PROFESSIONAL OPTION AND A POSSIBLE FAMILY CONTRIBUTION

Our paths in life often reveal our close persons’ suggestions and pieces of advice. That is the way things are as far as my interest for the realm of translations is concerned. To some extent, this interest is possible to be connected with my father, more precisely with his extensive translation of the novel Woodstock or the Cavalier by Sir Walter Scott, published in two editions in Cluj, Romania in 1993 and 2004.

He started this work without any material or professional interest (up to his retirement, he was a university professor, but not at the department of foreign languages) enlivened only by the enthusiastic attachment to the political message of this book. This message represents the confrontation between usurpation and legitimacy, – the favorite theme of Walter Scott, the creator of the universal historical novel. The writer illustrates it every time to reveal the final victory of legitimacy against the conspirators and persecutors’ plots. This time, the action revived the anti-monarchical persecution of the republican period subsequent to King Charles I’s execution on January 30, 1649. The novel presents the effort of the new regime to abolish the foundations of the monarchy completely. For this purpose, Cromwell’s attempt to annihilate Charles II, the fugitive heir to the Crown, is very important. He sets a trap for him: Woodstock palace that was in the possession of the admirable monarchist knight, Sir Henry Lee.

Lord Protector’s assumption regarding Charles II’s visit to Woodstock proves to be justified, as well as his decision to send to the old palace a spy commissioner, the military preacher Tomkins. But the end of the plot does not correspond to the conspirators’ plan. This is a reversal of the situation to which Tomkins, Cromwell’s trusted man contributes involuntarily to. Actually, the surprise is obvious in such troubled times when, as Sir Henry Lee says, inflexible decisions are bound to leave room for circumstances.

Specifically, to the same time of overturning the revolution is the interested change of the vocabulary undertaken by the followers of the new regime. Thus, they do not say: the King but “the Man”, not the King’s Son but “the Young Man”, not Royalist but “malignant”, namely malevolent, not King Charles I’s execution but – in their language attached to the Bible – “the New Jerusalem” and “the Reign of the Saints”, also addressing each other the hypocritical qualifiers of the same tone: – “poor”, “honest” and “faithful”.

As far as the narrative architecture is concerned, the novel possesses a rich range of attributes that influenced both the romantic writers’ predilection for sensational and adventure, and the importance of plausibility given by the realists. Thus, one can observe: false identities meant to conspire or to camouflage, aggressive outbursts of supernatural appearance intended to chase away Desborough, Harrison and Bletson, Cromwell’s acolytes, erotic audacities, a dueling intent, an unexpected murder involving Joliffe, the guard, and Tomkins, the spy, illustrating the old saying “The latter will be the first”, and finally, a spectacular siege.

I also add that the next picture reproduces the cover image of the remarkable translation.
In fact, this was not my father’s only indirect urge. I also owed the suggestion to translate into Romanian Henrik Ibsen’s play, John Gabriel Borkman to him. The translation, whose preface Between the risk of truth and the faces of delusion also signed by him, was also published in Cluj in 2010 and received excellent reviews.

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